What difference does “imported” make?

Heineken amused me.

Their latest print ad touts how awesome it is that their beer is imported. However, in England, Heineken is not imported. For English consumption, the Dutch beer is brewed in English breweries, under license from the Dutch corporate headquarters.

What’s the big deal about “imported” anyhow? “Chinese-made” used to mean poor quality. Now, nearly everything is made in China, and often with very high quality built in. “American” brands and “German” brands are made all over the world. Even Swiss watches may be assembled elsewhere.

Having said that, I still prefer certain countries of origin for certain products. What’s your favorite imported product and why do you like it better than the alternatives?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

3 Replies to “What difference does “imported” make?”

  1. Colombian coffee, roasted in Colombia (Sello Dorado brand). Smoother than the same coffee roasted in the US.

  2. The Heineken in Turkey is brewed in Turkey. At least it was when I lived there years ago. 

    With tariffs and other import fees, one difference between imported and domestic products is often COST. Maybe not true with all products, but with some.

  3. Cars from Germany — maybe a couple from Italy
    Beer from Britain or maybe Germany
    Suits from Saville Row and shirts from Bond Street.… well, maybe one day?

Comments are closed.