No sidewalks

nice neighborhoodI have always been baffled by this fact — some of the fanciest neighborhoods in Denver have no sidewalks. Here are some possible reasons why:

1. The residents never walk (which I know is not the case).

2. There is so little traffic that pedestrians need not fear fast-moving vehicles.

3. Everyone who drives in those neighborhoods is a good driver.

4. No pedestrians in those neighborhoods ever walk at dusk or dawn.

5. The city planners were trying to create a feeling of being in a rural area.

6. It’s a secret jab from local governments in recognition of the fact that the residents pay a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than the average sidewalked neighborhood’s residents. “You pay more taxes, we’ll give you sidewalks.”

Now, over to you — what is a reason you can come up with?

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It’s not going to happen

Rusty 1969 Ford ThunderbirdIt’s healthy to realize that some dreams are not going to happen. The owner of this 1969 Ford Thunderbird may never find the time or energy to turn his rusting beast into a gleaming factory condition sedan.

One way to deal with the loss of a dream is to get a lot of distance between you and that dream. In the case of the old Thunderbird, the owner should sell it to an antique car parts dealer. Then he will not be reminded of his unfinished project — and the massive amount of work ahead — every time he sees the old beast.

Another way to move forward when facing a lost dream is to pass that dream on to someone who can finish your project. You will first need to convince them of the value of your dream. In the case of the old Thunderbird, that may be impossible for the owner. But sharing your dream may bring joy to another!

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Better than new, sort of

Jeunet vintage bicycleIt was gorgeous. A 1974 Jeunet Franche-Comte bicycle. There’s something about seeing a perfect vintage object that almost can take my breath away.

I stopped to take a photo. The young owner came up while I was still admiring the art. He said a man printed up replica decals for restoration projects. The details weren’t perfect… It was a fixie instead of a 10-speed. The rims were of the modern tall style. The brakes were a replica of the German Weinmann brand, instead of the original French Mafacs. The handlebars were flat. But it was beautiful.

Even though newer bikes can run circles around this baby, it has a style that cannot be matched.

Art.

p.s. My Gitane is from the same era. I have made too many modifications for it to be close to the showroom-floor state.

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Blogs are dying

1972 bicycleYes, I really do believe blogs are dying.

One major reason for this change is the many faster and easier ways to put personal content up on the web, such as Instagram and Facebook. And I think a lot of people are getting burned out on posting to and reading blogs.

But I still love blogging, similar to how I love my 1972 Gitane road bike. Some old things are still worth hanging on to.

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The sadness of how little it’s worth

Old Tennis RacketsWhat once held value is now worth just a little above zero. These two tennis rackets are worth something to someone, but finding that someone would not be worth my time spent looking.

Ebay is a great avenue to sell many things. But the market for old tennis rackets is so small that few are selling there.

I think both of these rackets are beautiful. Sadly, my family does not have the space to store them nor the desire to put them up on a wall. So the thrift shop gets them. And at least a charity will benefit a small amount from the sale.

Here’s another tale of wasted beauty.

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